Gallery Mondays: Dogs at Fabiane’s Place by Tom Bob

#tombobnyc #fabianesplace

I was walking to South 4 Bar in Brooklyn for a Sob Sisters meeting that Ada Calhoun invited me to this evening when I stumbled upon this lovely street art next to Fabiane’s Cafe & Pastry Shop by Tom Bob (@tombobnyc on Instagram).

As if the dogs of NYC weren’t cute enough, now there’s six little pups immortalized in street art outside a cute Williamsburg cafe.

Tom Bob depicts the dogs against a New York City skyline with a red house behind them featuring a yellow bird on top. Very Charlie Brown-esque.

It’s little things like this that make me love stepping outside of Manhattan, even if just for an hour or two.

P.S. I think my favorite is wide-eyed Indigo, who appears to be a tan poodle!

See more of Tom Bob’s work on Instagram.

 

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Gallery Mondays: “Knickerbocker Ave” by Ryan Peltier

Knickerbocker Ave mta art Ryan Peltier

If NYC had an underground Halloween/macabre dance party, I think it would definitely look like Ryan Peltier’s “Knickerbocker Ave”. Especially if this underground party took place at a Brooklyn subway stop.

“Knickerbocker Ave” is one of those subway art cards I can’t stop staring at. Whenever I look at it, I notice something more and more absurdly funny every time!

The characters in this piece by Peltier are based on friends and neighbors he remembered during his time living in Bushwick, Brooklyn. The birds flying above the characters are also based on real subjects (pigeon people) he would see at the Kickerbocker Avenue stop.

Awkwardly contorted dancing aside, what is going on with the snowman-like figure in black? And the woman to his left with her hair covering half of her face? Is that even safe to be dancing so close to the yellow line with only one uncovered eye?!

Important questions!

See more of Peltier’s work here.

And, of course, if you like it so much that you want one for yourself, you can buy “Knickerbocker Ave” here.

Welcome to New York, Tom Duke

Part of a series on young professionals moving to New York City.

Name: Tom Duke
Age: 23
Hometown: Northampton, MA
Date Moved to NYC: May 1, 2016
Current Residence: Brooklyn, NY
Profession: Actor
Day Job: Expert at Uber (Independent Contractor)
College: Drew University in Madison, New Jersey
Major: Theatre Arts (Bachelor of Arts)
Class Year: 2015
Ethnic Background: Caucasian (Irish, Scottish, English, Polish, German, Spanish, and a bit of Native American)
Relationship Status: Single

welcome to ny tom duke

Me: How did you get into acting?
Tom Duke: When I was in 6th grade I did my first play, which was Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” and I loved that so I kept doing the play and the musical every fall and spring.

Me: Why did you pick Drew University?
TD: Well, for several reasons. It’s a small, liberal arts school that was far enough away from home but also not too far. It’s in a forest, which I really loved. There’s squirrels and deer and all that. They also have the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, which is on campus, so that was the draw, and the great theater program in general.

Me: What made you fall in love with Shakespeare?
TD: Like I said, my first play was “Twelfth Night,” but I think the real first work of Shakespeare that I fell in love with was “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” when I did that in 8th grade. I was one of the clowns, Rude Mechanicals, and it was just so much fun that I fell in love with it.

Me: Tell me a bit about your experience as a director. What aspect of performing is most exciting for you?
TD: I directed two scenes in my Acting and Directing class at Drew. One was a “Nonsense Scene,” which is a fairly meaningless dialogue that gains meaning through acting and directing choices, and the other was a scene from a play called “The Children’s Hour” by Lillian Hellman. My only other directing experience was of a staged reading of a student-written play, one of our department’s weekly “Plays in Process” series. I am most excited by language in performances, which is why I am so drawn to Shakespeare. I find great words and phrases delicious especially when they convey the passions of characters in turmoil or ecstasy.

Me: Tell me about “Tape.”
TD: That was for my Acting on Camera class and I recorded that last spring [2015]. Each thing I do is sort of challenging in its own way, and that particular challenge was playing the character as he didn’t believe that he’d raped the girl, but his friend had. It turned from what was a friendly hanging out to being accused of raping someone.

Me: What was it like reading through the script for the “Tape” scene?
TD: It was very conversational, very natural, but obviously a very dramatic situation. In my Acting on Camera class we were really focusing on the difference between on-camera acting and stage acting. On-camera acting is a lot more subdued. It’s a lot less projecting and more gestures so I was working on that for the scene too.

Me: What was it like transitioning from Massachusetts to New Jersey and then New York City?
TD: It was really different. Well, Massachusetts to New Jersey was not that different because they’re both kind of rural-ish, kind of a small town sort of thing with nature, but New York City is totally different. It’s so big. I’ve been here before and I’ve seen shows here but living here is just a lot. It’s also really good because there’s a lot of opportunities that I don’t have in other places like theater and also job opportunities.

actor tom duke times square

Actor Tom Duke in Times Square in July 2016.

Me: When you first moved to NYC you lived in Astoria, Queens. Why did you move to Brooklyn?
TD: I moved because I saw an apartment that looked nice and I liked the idea of living in Brooklyn.

Me: Tell me about your time as a legal courier.
TD: I had to go to mostly Manhattan, but a couple of times Brooklyn or Queens. Once I went into Bronxville.

Me: Oh?! So they just gave you the package and sent you all the way up there?
TD: Yeah, but it was only one time, though.

Me: What’s your preferred method of travel?
TD: The subway.

Me: Tell me your favorite line of Shakespeare.
TD: “Now is the winter of our discontent, made glorious summer by this sun of York […]” – “Richard III”

Catch Tom Duke as Brutus in “Julius Caesar” at Narrows Botanical Garden on August 13, 14, 20, and 21, 2016.

Gallery Mondays: Shout Out to the Bear @ the #Oscars

bear wood brooklyn

Last night was one for the history books.

Oscars 2016 will go down as the year that the Academy blatantly disrespected Black History Month by leaving all Blacks/African-Americans out of their nominations.

It will also go down as the year we were ready to throw the bear from The Revenant at them if they’d also blatantly disrespected Leonardo DiCaprio by letting him leave without the Oscar for Best Actor in a Lead Role.

And the bear from The Revenant even showed up to ensure that wouldn’t go down.

Leo won. Don’t worry. They’re off bear radar.

Let’s celebrate with this wooden bear I found outside of Berl’s Brooklyn Poetry Shop in Dumbo.

Because I think he’s still making our little golden Oscar knight sweat over there…

Leo DiCaprio Great Gatsby party

A little party never killed nobody. Congratulations, Leo!

Gallery Mondays: “Winter Break” by Adrian Tomine

adrian tomine winter break

Mid-winter break is over, kiddos.

Last week I found myself wandering into The POWERHOUSE Arena, a bookstore/exhibition space in Brooklyn, where I came across several prints by cartoonist Adrian Tomine.

Tomine’s “Winter Break” stood out to me the most for two reasons. The first was the fact that it was actually mid-winter break for NYC public school students, which I was constantly reminded of when I didn’t see the school crossing guard on the way to the train station during my morning commute. The second was the fact the cartoon depicts a juxtaposed snowy city scene with an ice cream truck waiting on the block for God knows who to buy ice cream from it in the freezing cold. “Winter Break” was originally published in the February 2, 2009 issue of The New Yorker.

What I love most about this print is the silhouette of the city in the background. The light green filter over the buildings give the print a serene touch.

This print is available for purchase on Adrian Tomine’s website, and of course, at The POWERHOUSE Arena.

Gallery Mondays: Cernesto’s Pabst Goddess

cernesto, pabst, goddess

It’s such a nice day out in New York, especially for what’s supposed to be 93 degree weather, so Gallery Mondays is headed to the outdoors this week.

I found this lovely goddess on Beford and N 8th in Brooklyn about two months ago. She’s holding Pabst Blue Ribbon beers in three of her four arms, and I think she’s holding a fourth with her foot.

Impressive.

I’m not sure if it’s accurate to call her a Pabst goddess because here she is again here sans the Pabst.

The mural was done by Cernesto, who paints a lot of murals with this pinkish-purple aura. After looking him up online I kind of want to go find all of the murals he’s painted in the U.S. and abroad.

See more of Cernesto’s murals here.

Gallery Mondays: Life Is Beautiful

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The one thing I love about Brooklyn is the amazing street art you’ll find as you walk through the neighborhoods. There’s something to love about graffiti that isn’t vandalism.

I found this gem on the side of a building on Roebling and N 9th. I really like the way the pink writing is sort of splattered with a bit of a paint drip along the side of the building and under some of the letters. The paper cut out collage look of the Roebling family portraits and other art decor behind the words is quite interesting as well.

And yes, life truly is beautiful.