April Favorites: #FyreFraud & Commuter Barbie

Now that all of the “It’s Gonna be May” and “May the 4th be with you” memes are over, it’s time to look back at April for some monthly favorites.

Let’s just say some very peculiar things happened in April 2017…

Shall we?

Favorite News Articles

1. #FyreFraud. Let the disaster that was Fyre Festival be a lesson to all the entrepreneurs of the world.

2. There’s a new Barbie in town, and she rides the NYC subway. I almost want to be 5 again so that I can play with this.

3. Apparently adults in Australia aren’t allowed to go to Legoland. Speaking of wanting to be 5 again…

4. You can now avoid annoying coworkers with a Google Chrome plugin. Beyond awkward moment when you get a phone call while your coworker is telling you the same sob story for the 50th time.

Favorite Music

1. “Saw You in a Dream” by Japanese House. I think she just went and plucked all of my heart strings to oblivion.

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Album Review: Foster the People’s ‘Supermodel’

Foster the People’s second album, Supermodel, was released today, March 18, 2014.

Supermodel is a bit different from the band’s previous album, Torches. It focuses more on the lyrics instead of the cool groovy beats that fans fell in love with on “Pumped Up Kicks” and “Call It What You Want.”

The first single from this album is called “Coming of Age,” which also happens to be the last song to be written for Supermodel.

When it came out in January, I was not impressed. Therefore, I wasn’t too excited about the release of the album today.

However, I decided to listen to the album anyway, and although I don’t completely hate it, I don’t exactly love it.

“Ask Yourself” and “Goats in Trees” are based heavily on acoustic guitar, making them sound very indie-folk.

The weirdest songs on the album are “Pseudologia Fantastica” and “A Beginner’s Guide to Destroying the Moon.” “Pseudologia Fantastica” features distorted vocals in the intro, which completely killed my vibe for the track. “A Beginner’s Guide to Destroying the Moon” is a crazy mix of loud unruly electric guitar and a broken record-sounding intro, which might come across as quite jarring to the average listener.

“The Angelic Welcome of Mr. Jones” is a short sample of the band’s perfect discordant harmonic abilities.

“The Truth” has some amazing lyrics, including my favorite line, “A purpose is needed before you know that you know / To never wonder what you are / And not forget where you’ve come from.”

Perhaps the most heartfelt song on Supermodel is “Fire Escape,” a very gloomy, stripped-down track. I love the part where Mark Foster sings,

I see the seasons change
All the young faces come and replaces the dying marks
Sit out on Lexington and Vine
All the pimps and prostitutes wave you down at stopping signs

Save yourself, save your yourself, yourself
Save yourself, save yourself.

My favorite’s on the album are “Are You What You Want to Be?,” “Nevermind” and “Best Friend.” I love the electric guitar chord progression in “Are You What You Want to Be?” The track “Nevermind” features a psychedelic repeated acoustic guitar melody coupled with soft vocals that play on the ear nicely. “Best Friend” is probably the closest you’ll get to the band’s old sound, with its groovy bass guitar and horns.

Supermodel is definitely a new spin on the band’s sound as compared to Torches, but fans might grow to like it.

Check out Supermodel on Spotify!