Gallery Mondays: ‘Happy City’ by Peter Sis

happy city peter sis 86 street subway art

Happy New Year!

I snapped a pic of this giant eye-shaped subway art at 86th Street on the 4, 5, 6 line last January. The piece is part of Czech-born artist Peter Sis’ Happy City.

From afar, this simply looks like a blue eye, and probably nothing more. However, if you get closer to it, you’ll notice a few intriguing details.

The first fun detail about this eye-shaped art is the fact that it’s outlines with the New York City skyline. In the blue sclera of the eye, there are a bunch of stars shining, which leads me to believe it represents the sky or a reflection of the night sky in a river or something.

Finally, there’s the part surrounding the iris, which features a few animals such as a pig, unicorn, and duck. There’s also a compass in the pupil.

I’m not sure what this all means, but to me it’s a sign to look closely. Things might end up being more than they seem in 2018.

Learn more about Happy City.

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Gallery Mondays: “Catching Lines” by James Yang

james yang catching lines mta subway art

I know what you’re thinking, but don’t worry, they’re all there, even the S!

I saw this MTA subway art card for the first time back in March, and have continued to see it on various trains since then. Called “Catching Lines,” the piece was created by Brooklyn-based artist James Yang.

His inspiration for this piece came from overhearing people giving subway directions, the result sounding to him as a Jetsons-like world of train lines floating above New York City.

I’d totally be okay with having trains fly. Do you know how much faster I’d get to work every morning? I mean, unless the MTA figures out a way to make signal malfunctions a thing in the sky too, it could be pretty awesome.

I just have one question for James Yang: What’s with the R being the only line showing up twice?

See more of Yang’s art at www.jamesyang.com, and you can buy “Catching Lines” here.

Gallery Mondays: A Bird’s Life by Elizabeth Grajales

a-birds-life-elizabeth-grajales

Time for some art from New York City’s underground!

On the way to the gym last month, I saw these gorgeous tiled art pieces by Elizabeth Grajales called A Bird’s Life on the platform of the 1 train at Penn Station.

I was drawn to it immediately because of the soft green color. I then noticed the black birds, which, in any other context, would have scared the daylights out of me. For some reason, this depiction of black birds with their young made them seem less frightful.

Learn more about A Bird’s Life here.

Gallery Mondays: Platform by Jillian Tamaki

jillian tamaki platform

As a New Yorker, I must say, this is a very accurate representation of an NYC MTA subway platform.

I’ve been seeing this art card on several trains, but since the cars are always packed to the brim, I could never get a good photo of it until recently.

Called “Platform,” the art card by Jillian Tamaki features a timeline of a diverse range of people waiting for and then walking towards what looks to be a 1 train at 50th Street. I love the girl holding a plant and hauling a small child with her toy in the 4th square from the left. I wonder if she’s the babysitter or older sister…

If you’ve seen “Platform” and wonder if you can buy it, you can, right here!

Gallery Mondays: Marcos Chin’s ‘Fulton Street, Beneath the Beautiful Blue’

marcos chin Fulton Street, Beneath the Beautiful Blue

I was riding the Q53 bus a few days ago when I saw illustrator Marcos Chin’s Fulton Street, Beneath the Beautiful Blue above the seats in front of the bus.

If you ride the NYC MTA subway, you’ve probably seen some of his other art, filled with interesting people and vibrant colors.

What I love the most about this one is the girl walking with a flower pot in hand. The way one of the flowers is sticking out of the pot makes it look like the gorgeous pink flower is actually a hair accessory. That had to be intentional, right?

See more of Marcos Chin’s work at www.marcoschin.com.

Gallery Mondays: Linda Ganjian’s ‘Home Sweet Home’

home sweet home linda ganjian 111 street subway station

I didn’t get to see the station art at 111 Street on the A train line until last month. I had honestly forgotten that the station got renovated in general, so it was nice walking onto the platform and seeing Linda Ganjian’s Home Sweet Home stainless steel cut outs on the panels.

What I really love about this is the fact that the design doesn’t end with the house. It continues in a neat border pattern, almost as if the house were being framed.

Funny that I actually was headed home sweet home when I saw them…

Learn more about Linda Ganjian’s art here.

Gallery Mondays: Béatrice Coron’s “Kind” at 104 Street Station

kind beatrice coron

Happy Columbus Day! The 104 Street station on the A line was completely renovated a few months ago, which brought some lovely artwork by Béatrice Coron to the platform.

Coron specializes in cut-out art. 104th Street station features her collection On the Right Track, which is a beautiful installation of human-like figures representing different characteristics such as “happy,” or, in this case, “kind.”

I love the fact that you can look at this piece of art and literally see through it. Looking at “Kind” and seeing the landscape through the carvings reminds makes the artwork seem as though it has a much more deeper meaning. Mother Nature is kind, as she gives us natural resources such as oxygen and water. We can see kindness in the woman represented in this piece of art, and literally through her we can see the gifts that Mother Nature gives us.

I also love the way the woman’s robe blends in with the rest if the carvings, making her seem like she’s floating in place.

Watch Béatrice Coron’s TED Talk about her creative process here.